INDIA: Mythology and Diwali rituals of Narakasur in Goa

Narak Chaturdasi is celebrated for Diwali in Goa. Huge effigies of Narkasur, made of grass and hay, dressed in colorful paper clothes and armed with swords and other armaments, are erected in the days preceding Diwali. Narkasur is paraded in the neighborhood accompanied by drums and songs. After dawn with taunts and insults, Narkasur is beheaded and cremated. Discover Mythology and Diwali rituals of Narakasur in Goa.

INDIA: Mythology and Diwali rituals of Narakasur in Goa

INDIA: Kanwar Yatra – History and Mythology of the pilgrimage of Lord Shiva’s Kanwariyas

In the month of Shravan, cities and towns of the Gangetic plains are inundated with people, dressed in orange, bearing saffron flags, marching to loud music, and carrying a stick sling with pots or bottles tied to either end. They are fetching Ganga water and bringing  to the local Shiva temple, a ritual that marks the end of summer and beginning of monsoon. They are the Kanwariyas. Discover the Kanwar Yatra – Mythology of the pilgrimage of Lord Shiva’s Kanwariyas.

INDIA: Kanwar Yatra – History and Mythology of the pilgrimage of Lord Shiva’s Kanwariyas

INDIA: Mythology of the Ganges river or Mother Ganga

The river Ganges meanders through various northern and eastern states of India, streams through Bangladesh, and vanishes into the Bay of Bengal. Ganga is a river and a goddess indivisible from each other. Her water has the power to cleanse — as most Hindus believe — every kind of sin. Bathing in Ganga liberates the soul as does dying in it reaffirming the Hindu notion of Moksha – salvation. Discover the Mythology of the Ganges river or Mother Ganga.

INDIA: Mythology of the Ganges river or Mother Ganga

INDIA | NEPAL: There be Unicorns – Myth & Folklore of the One – horned rhinoceros

At Bardia National Park, a lone rhino swishes out the elephant grass. We stand very near, quite at the riverbank peering behind tall grass, hearing – observing – now it is slowly reaching the water, peacefully munching. Floating happily into the river. Discover Myth & Folklore of the One-horned rhinoceros also known as the Indian Rhinoceros.

INDIA | NEPAL: There be Unicorns – Myth & Folklore of the One – horned rhinoceros

INDIA: Myths, folklore and taboos of Malana

Malana, is an isolated village of Himachal Pradesh, having their own parliament and constitution. The people of the village don’t consider themselves to be Indians, but Aryans so special you can not even touch them or their belongings. And they grow marijuana – it is everywhere. Discover Myths, folklore and taboos of Malana.

INDIA: Myths, folklore and taboos of Malana

INDIA: On the Coconut palm

Discover legends, myths and folklore of the coconut palm tree and its use in traditional Indian culture.

Oral literature abounds with proverbs, fables, myths, and legends associated with this special nut and have been associated with the origin of the plant in India, Malaysia, Hawaii, Myanmar, Maldives, Philippines, Indonesia, and Polynesian countries.

INDIA: On the Coconut palm

INDONESIA: Traditional Tajen- Cockfighting in Bali

Indonesia, like many other nations, has banned cock fighting as a cruel sport, although traditional Tajen- Cockfighting in Bali is still allowed for ceremonial purposes. The term bali refers to blood offerings and/or animal sacrifice. These fighting birds are as much a part of Balinese Hindu rites as the burning of incense and giving offerings to the gods.

INDONESIA: Traditional Tajen- Cockfighting in Bali

INDIA: FOLK TALES ON RICE

RICE IN INDIAN FOLK TALES

There’s more to rice than you think- Discover rice in Indian folk tales. India has a long and varied history, and its people are of most diverse origin and of different religious traditions. As might be expected, the folklore of India reflects this diversity of history and population. Several literary and religious collections of tales have been popular among the population for centuries.

INDIA: FOLK TALES ON RICE

INDIA: Myths, History and Folklore of RICE

There are many myths, legends and much folklore about rice. Gods or goddesses gave rice to humans and taught them how to grow it. In Asia, the rice spirit is female and often a mother figure. Religious use of rice takes place in China, Thailand, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Malaysia. Discover Myths, History and Folklore of RICE in India. INDIA: Myths, History and Folklore of RICE

The MOTHER GODDESS OF FERTILITY AND RICE

There are many myths, legends and much folklore about the mother goddess of fertility and rice. The ancient Indus community, perceived the Divine Female as Mother Goddess or Devi. Goddesses like Lakshmi, Gauri and Saraswati gave rice to Indians and taught them how to grow it. It was the practice of personifying the beauty and bounty of earth as a goddess and it was prevalent in ancient cultures. The MOTHER GODDESS OF FERTILITY AND RICE